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How students (mis- ) understand science and mathematics : intuitive rules Preview this item
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How students (mis- ) understand science and mathematics : intuitive rules

Author: Ruth Stavy; Dina Tirosh
Publisher: New York : Teachers College Press, 2000.
Series: Ways of knowing in science series.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In this groundbreaking volume, the authors identify three "intuitive rules" and demonstrate how these rules can be used to interpret important misconceptions many students have about science and math. By showing how learners react in similar ways to scientifically unrelated situations, the authors make a strong case for a theoretical framework that can explain these inconsistencies and predict students' responses to  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ruth Stavy; Dina Tirosh
ISBN: 0807739596 9780807739594 0807739588 9780807739587
OCLC Number: 44084009
Description: viii, 127 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: How children and adults use the intuitive rule "more A-more B" --
Learning about the intuitive rule "same A-same B" --
The nature of the intuitive rule "everything can be divided" --
Toward a theory of intuitive rules --
Using knowledge about intuitive rules: education implications.
Series Title: Ways of knowing in science series.
Other Titles: How students misunderstand science and mathematics
Responsibility: Ruth Stavy and Dina Tirosh.

Abstract:

This volume identifies three "intuitive rules" and demonstrates how they can be used to interpret misconceptions students have about science and maths. The authors make a strong case for a  Read more...
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