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Conjuring the folk : forms of modernity in African America Preview this item
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Conjuring the folk : forms of modernity in African America

Author: David Nicholls
Publisher: Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In a series of revisionary readings, Nicholls studies how the folk is shaped by the ideology of form. He examines the presence of a spectral folk in Toomer's modernist pastiche, Cane, and explores how Hurston presents folklore as a contemporary language of resistance in her ethnography, Mules and Men. In Claude McKay's naturalistic romance, Banana Bottom, Nicholls discovers the figuration of an alternative  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Folklore
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Nicholls, David, 1965-
Conjuring the folk.
Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, ©2000
(OCoLC)648669013
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Nicholls
ISBN: 0472110349 9780472110346
OCLC Number: 42786078
Description: xi, 180 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Conjuring the folk --
Modernism and the spectral folk: Jean Toomer's Cane --
Folklore and migrant labor: Zora Neale Hurston's Mules and men --
The folk as alternative modernity: Claude McKay's Banana bottom --
Rural modernity, migration, and the gender of autonomy: the novels of George Wylie Henderson --
The folk, the race, and class consciousness: Richard Wright's 12 million Black voices --
Conclusion: local histories and world historical narrative.
Responsibility: David G. Nicholls.

Abstract:

Provides a new way of looking at literary responses to migration and modernization  Read more...
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